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Street light answer to request for safety

| Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, 8:57 p.m.
The Herald
New lights were recently installed in front of the Middle Road Park. Jan Pakler | for The Herald

In an effort to boost traffic safety, Indiana Township Supervisors have approved the addition of a street light along Red Maple Lane.

The decision comes after several requests by residents, many of whom said they were worried about the extra traffic created by the newly built Middle Road fire hall on the adjacent street.

“The entrance to the new fire hall allows the firetrucks to enter on Red Maple so they don't have to stop on Middle Road and tie up traffic,” Manager Dan Anderson said.

Red Maple Lane is used to access Middle Road Park, a 40-acre site with five athletic fields.

It is a popular spot from spring to fall with youth sports.

Anderson said the existing traffic, combined with the addition of the firetrucks along the road, had some residents asking for increased safety measures.

Police Chief Bob Wilson reviewed the site and recommended the installation of the extra street light.

Anderson said he talked with Duquesne Light about the addition of a high-pressure 100-watt street light for that intersection.

It will cost the township about $17 a month.

In other news

Supervisor Jeff Peck said he has received complaints about abandoned properties in the Indianola section of the township.

Anderson said there are four homes with property-maintenance issues.

He said the information will be reviewed by code enforcement officer Jeff Curti, who will notify the owners and give them an opportunity to fix the violations before a citation is issued.

Tawnya Panizzi is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-782-2121, ext. 2 or at tpanizzi@tribweb.com.

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