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Equipment upgrade completes improvement plan for O'Hara Township parks

| Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, 9:01 p.m.
The Herald
New playground equipment along Lower Road in O'Hara at Slim Jim Parklet. Jan Pakler | for The Herald

When O'Hara Council devised a long-range plan to improve township parks, it didn't leave out even the smallest of spaces.

Slim Jim park, a tiny recreation spot off Lower Road, looks brand new thanks to a new swing set, see-saw and monkey bars.

Work is the last phase in the parks plan. It was wrapped up just in time for spring weather that's around the corner, Township manager Julie Jakubec said.

The cost was about $5,000.

“The equipment was aged,” she said. “We wanted to put in a little different variety down there that's now geared more toward younger kids.”

The park is situated on a narrow strip of land between Lower Road and Winchell Street.

There is also a half-basketball court for visitors of all ages. The court was last resurfaced about four years ago.

The upgrades were the last in a series that had each park in the township receive a facelift.

Over the last few years, money has been spent on a new tennis court surface at Meadow Park ($24,000), climbing equipment at Raymond Schafer Park ($12,000) and restrooms at Sacco Park ($28,000).

Last year, there was a new playground climber with slides installed at Woodland Park for $21,000.

There have been other improvements that weren't directly tied to athletics, such as parking lot paving at Squaw Valley Park and lighting at Sacco Park, which was part of a grant program through Duquesne Light.

“(Slim Jim) was the last little parklet that needed attention,” Jakubec said.

“That should take care of everything now.”

Tawnya Panizzi is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-782-2121, ext. 2 or tpanizzi@tribweb.com.

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