Share This Page

Security cameras assist Sharpsburg police

| Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Jan Pakler | for The Herald
Sharpsburg chief of police Leo Rudzki shows monitor with state of the art cameras all around the neighborhood.

A security camera system is already paying off for Sharpsburg police.

Police Chief Lou Rudzki said last week that the second phase of the camera system is complete. Grants totaling more than $100,000 funded 23 cameras throughout the borough.

Rudzki said officers watching the footage recently noticed drug activity and were able to make an arrest after recording the exchange on camera.

“The guys watched from the office … they went down (to the site) and made the arrest,” Rudzki said.

The cameras can be rotated and zoomed in and out to give officers different views of each site.

A large-screen monitor in the station shows feeds from each camera and officers can choose which one to focus on.

Work on the system began in 2009. Sharpsburg police have focused on cutting down drug activity in recent years and have teamed with Allegheny County and neighboring departments on investigations.

“This was a long time coming,” Rudzki said.

Rudzki said incidents such as the Boston Marathon bombing have shown how effective security cameras can be for police.

“If it wasn't for surveillance cameras, it might have been a long time making an arrest,” Rudzki said.

Rudzki thanked the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, Port of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala, Fugh Foundation and the Sharpsburg Veterans of Foreign Wars for their financial support with the system.

He also thanked several local business owners for infrastructure support.

Tom McGee is an associate editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 1513 or tmcgee@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.