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Fox Chapel woman pens book about battling cancer

| Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, 9:01 p.m.
Jan Pakler | for The Herald
Author and survivor Darlene Miloser shares her story in the form of a journal after receving news five years ago that she had cancer.

Darlene Miloser hopes that her experiences battling breast cancer can be comfort to someone going through a similar situation.

Miloser's first book, “Diary of a Breast Cancer Survivor,” will be in bookstores in December.

It's currently available online through Tate Publishing.

The book is a journal of her experiences as Miloser went through treatment for breast cancer. She's been in remission for five years.

When Miloser of Fox Chapel first got her diagnosis, she turned to her faith and made a pledge for when she went through treatment.

“If you let me live, I promise I will help as many women get through this as I can,” Miloser said.

Miloser began documenting her treatment in a journal. That journal makes up her book.

“It's just my thoughts, how I felt that day, what the chemo was like,” Miloser said.

She also began speaking at seminars as a patient ambassador for Genentech, makers of Herceptin, a breast cancer treatment drug.

Sharing her story has been helpful for her as well as others.

“It was therapeutic for me,” Miloser said.

When she was reviewing her journal to send to the publisher, she found some segments difficult to read but she felt the need to share her story with others.

“I laughed at a few things, and a few things I cried,” Miloser said.

She said her experiences in recent years make her feel like there was a reason for receiving her diagnosis.

“It makes me feel like I didn't get breast cancer for nothing,” Miloser said.

Tom McGee is an associate editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 1513 or tmcgee@tribweb.com.

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