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Borough officials want to see more benefits for Aspinwall from Allegheny Together

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Aspinwall hopes to get more from Allegheny Together as it continues with the program.

The borough entered into the Allegheny County-led economic development program in 2012. Council President Joe Noro said he and borough Manager Melissa Lang attended a recent meeting to hear concerns about various projects.

“There's a lot of items brought up that were not moving,” Noro said.

Noro said funding for many projects available through the program is not currently available. He said the borough will try to make progress with what it can.

“There's still things we can do. We may not have the money but we can move forward,” Noro said.

Parking and signs in the borough have been two issues studied through Allegheny Together. Council heard two proposals on those issues last year, but delayed action until more information could be gathered.

Lang said she is interested in talking with representatives from Tarentum on their experiences with the program.

“We've had two different experiences with Allegheny Together,” Lang said.

The borough has not been billed for its membership in the program, Lang said. Its first bill was due last year. The borough had budgeted $5,000 for the program. Lang said there is no contract associated with the program and the borough can quit at any time.

“If we do continue and we don't feel we've made progress and then we get this big payment at that time we can make the decision of what we'd like to do,” Lang said.

Councilman Joseph Warren said he was satisfied with the first year of the program and said it provides ways for various groups to help improve Aspinwall.

“A lot of those tools can be used between the Shade Tree Commission and the Chamber of Commerce and the Civic Association and the other groups of people throughout the borough that want to make this a better place to live and shop,” Warren said.

Tom McGee is an associate editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 1513, or tmcgee@tribweb.com.

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