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Aspinwall seeks help collecting ticket fees

| Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 9:01 p.m.
Jan Pakler | for The Herald
Street sweeping has started in Aspinwall bringing about tickets along Virginia Avenue.

Aspinwall could look to outside help to collect fees from unpaid parking tickets.

Officials are considering allowing Penn Credit to help collect unpaid parking tickets that have accumulated from repeat offenders. Borough manager Melissa Lang said using the company would not cost the borough any money and a 25 percent fee would be added to the tickets the firm collects.

“We would turn in our tickets to them, they would then go after our repeat offenders to collect our fees that they owe us,” Lang said.

Lang said she was unsure how much the borough could collect through Penn Credit but the borough is owed about $2,000 in delinquent ticket fees.

The borough sends a letter to people with delinquent tickets after 30 days to notify them of an increased fine and that additional fines will be added if it goes to the magistrate's office.

Lang said they would add a line to that letter notifying them that fines also could come from Penn Credit if the ticket isn't paid.

“Some of the people that have up to 30 tickets really don't care so they haven't paid them,” Lang said. “What we need now is a way to go after those people.”

Mayor Joe Giuffre said most residents don't have a problem with the parking regulations, meaning that raising the fine wouldn't be a fair way to convince people to follow the rules.

“I wouldn't want to raise the fine on everybody who makes a mistake once,” Giuffre said.

Councilman Joseph Warren said he would be in favor of using the company.

“It makes good sense, especially if there's no cost to it,” Warren said.

Tom McGee is an associate editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 1513, or tmcgee@tribweb.com.

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