ShareThis Page

Youngwood, Greensburg receive recycling grants

| Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013, 6:42 p.m.

Youngwood and Greensburg will be buying equipment after receiving state grants for recycling.

The state Department of Environmental Protection has awarded $77,130 to Youngwood and $34,704 to Greensburg for recycling programs.

Youngwood will use the grant money, plus some of its own, to buy a backhoe, a wood chipper, a leaf vacuum, a leaf vacuum box and signs about recycling, said John Storey, Youngwood public works supervisor.

“Essentially, we're getting about $170,000 worth of equipment, and the borough part will be about $45,000,” Storey said. “So ... we're using our money the most effective way we can.”

Youngwood's share of costs is based on a formula, Storey said.

Borough leaders expect to make up the difference between the equipment's total cost and funding via vehicle trade-ins, Storey said.

“All the equipment that we will obtain is used as part of our recycling program,” he added.

Greensburg will use its grant to buy a brush chipper, City Administrator Sue Trout said.

Greensburg's share will be $3,856, or 10 percent, she said.

Youngwood crews pick up recyclables and leaves. The borough has drop-off areas for yard waste and brush. In addition, the borough offers a recycling drop-off area at the public works facility on South Third Street.

Youngwood went to a single-stream recycling collection system in January. About 1,200 households received recycling carts in December.

Borough leaders expect recycling tonnage to increase, because recyclables — glass bottles and jars, metal and aluminum cans, most plastic containers and jugs, flattened boxes and cardboard and newspapers — can all go into one container, rather than separate bins.

Officials hoped the increased recycling efforts would enhance the community's standing as they sought the grant.

The borough collected about 200 tons of leaves last year, Storey said.

Greensburg's new piece of equipment will replace a 1990 brush chipper, Trout said.

“Our chippers are heavily used year-round picking up brush and chipping disposed Christmas trees after the holidays,” she said. “Our brush pickup is one of the best services the city of Greensburg offers its residents. It is a very popular program, which the residents have come to expect.”

This year, the DEP awarded $17.8 million to 131 municipalities and counties for recycling programs.

State law requires municipalities with more than 10,000 residents to recycle. Communities with populations between 5,000 and 10,000 and having a population density greater than 300 people per square mile also must recycle.

The DEP reports that 440 of the state's 2,700 municipalities recycle and provide curbside collection programs.

Bob Stiles is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-836-6622 or bstiles@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.