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Swim-a-thon raises money for Greensburg Y's Strong Kids Campaign

| Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, 6:12 p.m.
Senior N'Dia Smith of the Greensburg Salem High School swim team participates in Swim-A-Thon to raise money for the Greensburg YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Senior N'Dia Smith of the Greensburg Salem High School swim team participates in Swim-A-Thon to raise money for the Greensburg YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign.
The Greensburg Salem swim team holds a Swim-A-Thon to raise money for the Greensburg YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign. All money raised will be earmarked for scholarships to the Y, which does not turn anyone away due to financial need. Last year, $43,888 was raised and 93 percent went to scholarships for children to attend YMCA camps and programs.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
The Greensburg Salem swim team holds a Swim-A-Thon to raise money for the Greensburg YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign. All money raised will be earmarked for scholarships to the Y, which does not turn anyone away due to financial need. Last year, $43,888 was raised and 93 percent went to scholarships for children to attend YMCA camps and programs.
The Greensburg Salem swim team jumps into the pool to begin a Swim-A-Thon to raise money for the Greensburg YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign. All money raised will be earmarked for scholarships to the Y, which does not turn anyone away due to financial need. Last year, $43,888 was raised and 93 percent went to scholarships for children to attend YMCA camps and programs.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
The Greensburg Salem swim team jumps into the pool to begin a Swim-A-Thon to raise money for the Greensburg YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign. All money raised will be earmarked for scholarships to the Y, which does not turn anyone away due to financial need. Last year, $43,888 was raised and 93 percent went to scholarships for children to attend YMCA camps and programs.

Twenty members of the Greensburg Salem High School swim team took to the pool at the YMCA in Greensburg last week to help younger children.

The high school boys and girls participated in a "swim-a-thon" to raise money for the Y's Strong Kids Campaign.

The program awards scholarships to children who cannot afford to take part in Y programs.

Some of the money swimmers raised will be used for Greensburg Salem middle school students who take part in swimming at the Greensburg YMCA after their competitive season ends in October.

“Some of the middle-schoolers want to continue with swimming, and the only way they could (do so) was at the Y,” said Curt Smith, an assistant swim coach and Greensburg YMCA board member.

The senior high swimmers logged more than 200 laps during about 2½ hours in the YMCA pool on Feb. 6, Smith said.

“I believe that these kids have really stepped it up, and this was a sensational thing for them to do,” said Jennifer Prohaska, Greensburg YMCA senior program director.

Swimmers will collect donations pledged in lump-sum payments or based on number of laps they completed, Smith said.

“It was something they wanted to do on their own for us, which I think is remarkable,” Prohaska said.

Last year, the Strong Kids Campaign raised nearly $43,000, with 93 percent of the scholarships awarded to children, YMCA officials said.

“With the Strong Kids Campaign, every dollar that our campaigners raise goes strictly to scholarship money at this particular Y,” said Jennifer Tinsman, financial development director. Some money allowed adults to participate in programs.

Organizers have set a goal of $50,000 for this year's campaign.

Bob Stiles is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-836-6622 or bstiles@tribweb.com.

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