ShareThis Page

Hempfield senior's haircut helps raise more than $7,500 for Children's Hospital

| Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015, 8:51 p.m.
Hempfield Area High School senior Sarah Daehler of Hempfield and University of Pittsburgh freshman Nick Grott of Irwin have raised over $7,000 for the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation.
Submitted
Hempfield Area High School senior Sarah Daehler of Hempfield and University of Pittsburgh freshman Nick Grott of Irwin have raised over $7,000 for the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation.
Hempfield Area High School senior Sarah Daehler of Hempfield and University of Pittsburgh freshman Nick Grott of Irwin have raised over $7,000 for the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation.
Submitted
Hempfield Area High School senior Sarah Daehler of Hempfield and University of Pittsburgh freshman Nick Grott of Irwin have raised over $7,000 for the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation.

A Hempfield Area High School senior and a University of Pittsburgh freshman have raised more than $7,500 for the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation using Twitter.

In early December, Hempfield student Sarah Daehler of Hempfield tweeted that if she raised more than $500 for cancer patients, she would shave her hair and donate it to Locks of Love.

In the month that followed, her friend Nick Grott, a Pitt student from Irwin, joined the campaign, promising not only to shave his head, but to also get a tattoo to draw attention to pediatric cancer.

Daehler said she was inspired by a family friend who died from melanoma last January. She was also inspired by a childhood friend who died from a brain tumor at age seven.

“Basically I knew I wanted to raise money and awareness for cancer,” Daehler said. “I shaved my head on Jan. 18, which was the anniversary of the death of our family friend.”

Grott said his life was similarly affected by cancer. Both of his grandparents had cancer, along with several of his friends' parents. He said it took Daehler's motivation to start raising money for the cause.

“Sarah inspires me,” Grott said. “She is so incredibly selfless and I try to be like that as well. It kind of sparked a lot of motivation in me.”

The two took to Twitter several times, posting updates and a countdown to the day they would shave their heads. The fundraiser took off as the two received donations from family and close friends. Daehler said she received several donations from classmates, despite the fact that the fundraiser was not school-sanctioned.

On what the two called “shave day,” they headed to Great Clips in Hempfield.

“We made an episode out of it,” Grott said. “We had such a great time.”

Grott got his closely cut hair completely shaved, while Daehler started the show by chopping her long blond waves into a mohawk.

“I thought, ‘If I'm shaving my head, I have to take advantage of the situation,'” Daehler said. “It was really fun and I didn't think it was scary.”

After enjoying her mohawk for a few minutes, Daehler had her head completely shaved.

Once the two finish collecting donations, they hope to visit the pediatric oncology unit at Children's to donate.

While their hair will grow out, it's clear that this experience will have a lasting effect on both Daehler and Grott.

Daehler said she hopes to eventually have an impact on cancer patients by working in the medical field. She hopes to begin her career by studying at Bates College in Maine.

Grott said the fundraiser inspired him to switch his major and to begin studying nursing at the University of Pittsburgh.

“It's been a fantastic experience,” Grott said. “It's just really humbling to see what we can do.”

Alicia McElhaney is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.