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Prints worth $11K to headline Latrobe art auction

Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Two prints valued together at $11,000 and a photograph featuring a local golf legend with a competitor will be among the items featured in the sixth annual art auction fundraiser to benefit the Latrobe Art Center.

“Every year it's different,” said committee member Joe Bellack.

The two prints are mid-1970s Norman Rockwell lithographs signed by the artist, known for his portrayals of everyday American life.

Given by an anonymous donor, one of the prints, “Summer Stock,” shows a costumed woman holding a hand mirror and applying lipstick while she perches on packing crates with two chickens.

“It's a very comical print of a woman getting ready to go on at summer theater,” Bellack said. The print is valued at $4,000.

The other, “Colonial Sign Painter,” features an artist painting a portrait on a wooden sign while three people stare intently at his work. A limited edition that is signed, the print is valued at $7,000.

In addition, Arnold Palmer and his wife, Kathleen, donated a photo of the golfer with Jack Nicklaus, signed by both sports legends.

“She and Arnie both support the art center auction quite a bit yearly,” Bellack said.

As one of the primary fundraisers for the center, the auction event “An Evening in the Neighborhood” will be held at 6 p.m. Sept. 25 at Latrobe Country Club. Tickets are $50 per person and $75 at the patron level, available at the art center.

The live and silent auctions will include more than 100 items, such as local fine art and jewelry as well as baskets of gifts.

Other raffles will be held throughout the night, including helium balloons for purchase with guaranteed prize tickets inside them.

Bellack said the committee, including honorary Chairwoman Nancy Rogers Crozier, remembers Elizabeth “Libby” Hazlett, who founded the center with Crozier.

Crozier said they began the Latrobe Art Center as something simple: a place for the community to gather and showcase local art.

Now Crozier said she is glad it has grown to include many more programs, events and exhibits than she imagined, thanks in part to the vision of director Gabi Nastuck.

“Gabi has been such a wonderful director for us. She's so vibrant and has so many wonderful ideas,” Crozier said. “She's really the catalyst behind the wonderful showplace we have now.”

The center uses proceeds from the auction to support art programs that benefit children in after-school programs, provide therapy to special-needs children and teach senior citizens, Bellack said.

Stacey Federoff is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-6660 or sfederoff@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


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