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2nd Elizabeth DVD provides historic images

| Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, 12:36 a.m.

It's hard to contain the story of a community on just one DVD. Ask Lynn Rockwell, a community organizer and business owner in Elizabeth.

Several years ago she compiled a collection of past and present town photos and released them as a video documentary called “Views from Second Street.” It told the story of the heart of the borough's business district.

Rockwell sold about 250 copies, priced at $10 each, in her restaurant, Rockwell's Red Lion, and used the proceeds to fund the Monongahela Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation and the Plum Street Project's Sounds of Summer concert series.

Now Rockwell has turned her focus to other parts of the borough in a follow-up documentary called “The Second DVD.” It offers a historical tour of Town Hill, Walker's Heights, Third Street and Lower Elizabeth.

“There was so much there,” Rockwell said. “We just put the pictures in a geographical order.”

As on the first DVD, Rockwell's father serves as narrator.

“It's just stuff from my memory,” Orrie Rockwell Jr., 74, who has lived in Elizabeth all of his life, said of his commentary.

He said the new DVD offers great images of the town's old schools, churches and cemeteries. Some of the images date from the pre-automobile period, while others were taken recently, he said.

Both videos are about 90 minutes long.

A third documentary about the areas around Railroad and First streets and the town's ties to the Monongahela River is in the works. Anyone with pertinent photos who wants to contribute is asked to contact the restaurant at 412-384-3909.

Eric Slagle is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1966, or eslagle@tribweb.com.

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