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Dido keeps distinctive tunes coming

| Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 2:36 a.m.

‘Girl Who Got Away'

Dido (RCA)

★★★★

I've been a big fan of British songstress Dido since the late 1990s. She has one of the loveliest and most distinctive voices in pop music and her 1999 “No Angel” debut has taken up permanent residence in my iPod. Her follow-up albums (2003's “Life for Rent” and 2008's “Safe Trip Home”) were every bit as good — as was her cameo on the Eminem hit “Stan” — but Dido's star has steadily dimmed over the years. The fantastic “Girl Who Got Away” is her first record in five years — an eternity in the music business — and I'm thrilled to report that she's in fine form throughout the 11-track release.

Less than a minute into sublime opener “No Freedom” I found myself being swept away by Dido's lovely voice, and she continues to impress on the title track, “End of Night,” “Sitting on the Roof of the World,” “Love to Blame,” “Happy New Year” and closing gem “Day Before We Went to War.” Her collaborative spirit is alive and well on “Let Us Move On,” my favorite cut on “Girl Who Got Away,” which features a fantastic guest spot from white-hot rapper Kendrick Lamar. Here's hoping we won't have to wait so long for Dido's next album.

Jeffrey Sisk is a managing editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161 ext. 1952 or jsisk@tribweb.com.

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