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West Elizabeth seeks estimates to repair municipal building

| Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 2:11 a.m.

West Elizabeth is getting an estimate this week on the cost of repairing the municipal building.

“The foundation is sinking in the middle,” Councilwoman Janet Isaacs said. “There are stress fractures all over the building, as well.”

She said a structural engineer from Alltech Engineering & Home Inspection Services recently assessed the building located at 800 Fourth St.

“There's a problem,” Isaacs said. “It's not a bad problem, but it's definitely a problem.”

She said she will have as many as three companies give free estimates on lifting the foundation.

Isaacs said the structural engineer also noted the waterspouts on the corners of the building should be extended.

Borough code enforcement officer Bill Wolfgang asked if council wanted him to call a company named Geese Police to use dogs to chase away the geese in West Elizabeth Ball Field.

“They do it three times daily,” he said. “They do it by the week and it's $350 for the week.”

Wolfgang said it's nesting time for the geese so the borough has to deal with them soon.

Council vice president Frank Magill asked if the geese are still in the ballpark because the ground has been fixed and there are no longer puddles of water.

Contractor Ray Dodds said he didn't see any when he was refurbishing the ball field and installing French drains.

“Sometimes there are none there,” Wolfgang said. “Sometimes there's like 20 to 25.”

“I went by several times and saw the geese between the ball field and Water Street,” Councilman Daryl Celestino said.

Magill said Wolfgang should wait a couple weeks before making any moves to hire the Geese Police.

Stacy Lee is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1970, or slee@tribweb.com.

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