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W. Homestead hopes to attract bike shop

| Friday, April 19, 2013, 4:06 a.m.

West Homestead officials are looking to recruit a bicycle shop to occupy one of its storefronts.

“We need a storefront that will be accessible to the trail, so Eighth or Seventh avenues would work very well,” borough Councilwoman Margaret Holder said. “It needs to be ready to rent.”

She said the idea came from a planning commission meeting last month. Holder said the Courtyard by Marriot near the Great Allegheny Passage in West Homestead's section of the Waterfront had nearly 1,100 bikes delivered to it last summer.

A ribbon cutting at Sandcastle is planned on June 15 at 10 a.m. to celebrate the completion of the Great Allegheny Passage.

A ride from Sandcastle to Point State Park is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. followed by a presentation and unveiling of the marker at the Point at 1 p.m.

“The Steel Valley Trail Council is very interested in the possibility of having some events after the ribbon cutting,” Holder said. “The ride will take place to Point State Park. They mentioned knowing (West Homestead) has bicycle officers and the possibility of having a safety educational event.”

West Homestead Councilman Robert Cherep said he spoke with someone interested in opening a bicycle shop.

“He thought it was a great idea,” he said. “He was more or less interested in the storage space.”

Holder added that space would be needed if the business wanted to be involved in bicycle rentals.

Cherep said there should be room for bicyclists to ride in the shop, as well.

When it is completed, the Great Allegheny Passage will run non-top to Cumberland, Md., where it will meet with the C&O Canal Towpath to create a 335-mile route between Point State Park and Washington.

Stacy Lee is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1970, or slee@tribweb.com.

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