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Carnegie Library of Homestead seeks librarian

Michael DiVittorio
| Monday, June 17, 2013, 2:36 a.m.

Carnegie Library of Homestead officials are seeking a new librarian because their library services coordinator/youth services librarian left to pursue another career.

Emily Salsberry served the Munhall library for eight years. She left on May 23 for a banking position in Moon Township.

“She was loved by all, especially our community children and home schoolers,” library director Carol Shrieve said. “We wish her nothing but the best and will miss her dearly.”

Shrieve said the library was working with Salsberry to acquire library certification when she elected to move in another direction.

Salsberry has a degree in art education. Pennsylvania requires library directors/managers to hold a master's of library science degree and be a state certified librarian, or have a provisional librarian certification for smaller sized communities.

Shrieve said the library is working to redefine the library services coordinator/youth services position, taking into consideration the state and Allegheny County requirements for librarian certification, and hopes to have the position filled by summer's end.

“The state has been kind to work with us since the departure of our library director (Tyrone Ward) a few years ago,” Shrieve said. “While the title of this new role is yet to be determined, we are looking to hire a library managerial individual with a true leadership presence inclusive of the required state certification, to spearhead not only youth programming, but also adult and senior programming. Those are areas we've focused minimally in the past. Our community thrives on programming at all levels — so we need to meet this demand now.”

Ward was laid off in August 2008. Officials at the time said the cut was made for financial reasons.

Salsberry's position is expected to be posted this week.

Shrieve said Salsberry's departure should not impact the library's summer programs because the schedule was mapped out prior to her departure.

“Our AmeriCorps staff and (University of Pittsburgh) interns are so enthusiastic to spearhead most of the daily programming,” Shrieve said. “We do have two wonderful camps coming up which are free to our community families.”

Carnegie Science Center will host a camp for community youth today through Thursday, and Pennsylvania American Water Co. will host a three-day camp for children June 24-26. Parents may call 412-462-3444 for more information.

More information about the library and its programs is available online at www.homesteadlibrary.org.

Michael DiVittorio is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1965, or mdivittorio@tribweb.com.

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