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Reviews: Rainbow connection creates rock bliss

By Brian Krasman
Tuesday, July 2, 2013, 1:21 a.m.
 

‘Bosnian Rainbows'

Bosnian Rainbows (Sargent House)

★★★★

Putting together two artists as strong willed and creative as Omar Rodriguez-Lopez (At the Drive In, the Mars Volta) and Teri Gender Bender (Le Butcherettes) could cause a battle for control, but instead, it leads to rock bliss.

Their new band Bosnian Rainbows works splendidly, with guitarist Rodriguez-Lopez concentrating more on digestible melodies and Gender-Bender working wonders on the mic, striking resemblances to the Pretenders or PJ Harvey fronting a channeled explosion. The record gets more infectious with each listen, with the band reaching high points on anthemic “Worthless,” weird but wondrous “The Eye Fell in Love,” and shadowy ballad “Morning Sickness.” Tremendous debut record.

‘11:11--Deluxe 20th Anniversary Edition'

Come (Matador)

★★★★

Over the course of a decade, Come made four records that influenced and helped shape the slowcore movement, but they never became a household name (even after opening for bands such as Nirvana and Pavement). But with the reissue of their excellent 1992 debut “11:11,” hopefully those lagging behind can catch up.

Thalia Zedek led this under-appreciated band, along with Chris Brokaw (Codeine), and they won a lot of hearts with this record that slithers and slides, slowly bruising you on tracks such as “Submerge,” “Dead Molly,” and “Sad Eyes.” Tacked on is a bonus disc of their 1992 live performance from Vermonstress Festival, along with another 7-inch if you grab the vinyl version. This is a classic misery maker.

‘Make All of the Hell of Dark Metal Bright'

Kwaidan (Bathetic)

★★★½

With all the dark thunderstorming lately, Kwaidan's new “Make All the Hell of Dark Metal Bright” has been a great, spacey companion. Comprised of members of Zelienople and Locrian, their dreamy, doomy six-song effort will mess you up.

Mixing post-rock, ambiance, black metal, and ominous doom, this instrumental mammoth can soothe and shake you at the same time. It works best when heard front to back (especially since the first three tracks are woven together), and this murky ghost in the night could leave you in a mysterious cold sweat. Approach with caution.

Brian Krasman is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

 

 
 


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