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Lincoln's annual food drive runs through December

Michael DiVittorio
| Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, 2:46 a.m.
Lincoln police officer Michael Mihal, junior Councilman Falco Muscante II, junior Councilwoman Lexi Firda and police Chief Richard Bosco make the first donations in this year's borough food drive for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.
Michael DiVittorio
Lincoln police officer Michael Mihal, junior Councilman Falco Muscante II, junior Councilwoman Lexi Firda and police Chief Richard Bosco make the first donations in this year's borough food drive for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

Families throughout the Mon Valley and surrounding areas rely on the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank and pantries for meals, especially during the holiday season.

Food drives such as the one sponsored by Lincoln for the last five years help to replenish the bank's supplies.

The borough office at 45 Abe's Way, is collecting canned goods and nonperishable items Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. through December. Donations will be delivered in January.

“We've seen support throughout the years,” Councilwoman Tammy Firda said. “Some years have been better than others. A lot of it depends on how much the word gets out to the residents. I give them a lot of credit because, even though we're large in size, we're small in numbers. We have 1,100 residents in approximately 450 homes. The residents still do what they can for donating to the food bank every year.”

Junior Councilman Falco Muscante II stressed the importance of donating during the winter holiday months. He said his family assists the Glassport Assembly of God's food bank.

“It's kind of important to donate to the food bank and food drive because people who may not have the same resources deserve to eat too,” Muscante said.

“It's a time to give back to your community and it's a time to help others who are in need,” junior Councilwoman Lexi Firda said. “Most people are so fortunate to be able to have food every day and have a meal. There are kids in the world who don't have a meal every day, and it's important to make sure that they do.”

“Food drives have always been a powerful way to contribute to the food bank's mission to end hunger,” said Lisa Scales, CEO of Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

She said 475,040 pounds of food and non-food products, valued at $802,817, were collected last fiscal year.

“Not only do the drives produce critical food to our hungry neighbors in need, but they serve as a catalyst that brings the issue of hunger to the forefront, providing immeasurable value to our mission,” Scales said.

Scales said young people can make a major contribution to stopping hunger.

“Children begin to discuss the issue in the classroom; food insecurity becomes a topic that colleagues talk about at lunch,” Scales said. “So there is a ripple effect. The more our story of hunger is heard and people understand how easy it is take action, the closer we get to a solution to the problem.”

Information about the food bank and its programs is available online at www.pittsburghfoodbank.org.

Donations can be made through the website, including via a virtual food drive.

Michael DiVittorio is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161 ext. 1965, or mdivittorio@tribweb.com.

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