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Port Vue father, son found dead

| Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013, 4:41 a.m.
Cindy Shegan Keeley | Daily News
Allegheny County forensic investigators load evidence from 1920 New York Ave. in Port Vue. A father and son were found dead at that residence Tuesday morning.
Cindy Shegan Keeley | Daily News
Port Vue police and Allegheny County forensic investigators respond to 1920 New York Ave. in the borough after two bodies were found inside Tuesday morning.
CIndy Shegan Keeley | Daily News
Port Vue residents Frank and Lori Cortazzo talk about their neighbors Richard and Mickey Liposchok, who were found dead inside their home at 1920 New York Ave. Tuesday morning.
Richard Liposchok

A Port Vue man and his mentally disabled son were found shot to death in their home Tuesday.

Borough police Chief Bryan Myers said a housekeeper called police around 9 a.m. after seeing a male lying inside the house along New York Avenue.

“We did break in the front door, found one deceased male on the living room floor and one deceased male in a bedroom,” Myers said. “At that time, Allegheny County Homicide was called in for the investigation.”

Neighbors identified the victims as Richard Liposchok, 78, and Mickey Liposchok, 52. Police said they are investigating their deaths as a possible murder-suicide.

Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Office said an autopsy is scheduled for Wednesday.

“At this point in the investigation, we do not believe a third party is responsible for their deaths,” Allegheny County homicide Lt. Andrew Schurman said.

Frank and Lori Cortazzo have lived across from the Liposchoks for the past nine years.

Frank Cortazzo said Richard Liposchok was well-known in the community and was Port Vue's historian.

“I don't know if it's an official title, but everybody called him Lippy,” he said. “He had all kind of articles from (The) Daily News in his basement. He pulled out articles of me when I played football here at South Allegheny. He kept everything.”

Richard Liposchok was a member of Vigilant Hose Co. No. 1 for decades.

He and his wife, Gail, cared for their son together until she died in November 2012.

Lori Cortazzo said Mickey Liposchok was very nice and would call his mother “sweetheart.”

“They were early to bed, early to rise. They were good people,” she said.

“(Richard's) a proud man and he wanted to take care of his son as much as he could,” Frank Cortazzo said. “He was a great guy and a great person for the town of Port Vue ... It's a shock.”

Michael DiVittorio is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1965, or mdivittorio@tribweb.com.

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