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System shift put Mon-Yough area in storm's path

| Friday, Feb. 14, 2014, 3:56 a.m.
Rick Zak uses a salt spreader to keep the sidewalks around UPMC McKeesport's engineering department clear of new snow.
Cindy Shegan Keeley | Daily News
Rick Zak uses a salt spreader to keep the sidewalks around UPMC McKeesport's engineering department clear of new snow.

Although the winter storm that paralyzed the East Coast on Thursday was projected to skirt the Pittsburgh region, Mon-Yough residents woke to an unexpected layer of more snow and ice.

Meteorologist Lee Hendricks of the National Weather Service in Pittsburgh said the system's path shifted slightly to the west overnight, bringing up to 2 inches of snow to portions of the region.

“It's amazing the snow amounts we're getting out of this,” Hendricks said.

While the additional accumulation slowed morning commuters, Hendricks said the unpredictable storm could have been much worse.

“Nearby places like Preston and Tucker counties in West Virginia were hit pretty good,” he said. “Although there were winter warnings there, they got between 6 and 16 inches.”

The system continued to bring light snow to the Pittsburgh region into the evening, but another storm from the Great Lakes was expected to add another inch or so of snow overnight into Friday.

“We're going to keep a chance of snow showers in the forecast through Saturday morning,” Hendricks said. “Then snow showers should start again Saturday night, but that should be the end of it until the beginning of next week.”

Temperatures are expected to creep into the upper 30s on Monday and Tuesday, with a possible high on Wednesday in the lower 40s.

But Hendricks said there's still plenty of time for more significant storms this season.

“Historically, some of our largest snowfalls have come in March,” he said.

So when does he believe residents can finally begin to relax?

With a slight chuckle, Hendricks said, “June.”

Tim Karan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1970, or tkaran@tribweb.com.

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