ShareThis Page

Clairton marks Month of Young Child with parade, assembly

| Thursday, April 17, 2014, 1:41 a.m.
Jennifer R. Vertullo | Daily News
Clairton elementary students and staff celebrate the Month of the Young Child by dancing with Big Bird, portrayed by sophomore Krislynn Jones, during a Wednesday morning parade and performance.
Jennifer R. Vertullo | Daily News
Clairton twins, from left, Kenneth and Vester Rowe are encouraged by principal Magi Berger as their second-grade class performs the inspirational song 'What I Am' with fellow elementary students on Wednesday.

Clairton City School District encourages teachers, parents and the community to celebrate early childhood education.

The elementary school hosted its annual Month of the Young Child parade and assembly on Wednesday, inviting parents and city officials into the school. Dressed in a rainbow of colors representing each classroom, students in kindergarten through second grade marched through the halls and performed in the gymnasium.

“The kids work so hard all year, and this is a nice, fun reward,” said Bethany Sporio, whose children are in kindergarten and second grade. “They are the center of attention today. They're getting a jump start on spring break with a celebration that's all about them.”

Elementary principal Magi Berger said early education — even before kindergarten — is important to a child's development and success, and having community support behind that knowledge pushes students even further.

“It's important for us to get as many parents and community members into our school as we can to spread the word that we are educating our children,” Berger said.

The Month of the Young Child is a Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children extension of the national Week of the Young Child, which began in 1971 to focus public attention on the needs of young children and families. It promotes early learning and literacy through pre-K and elementary programs.

Each year, Clairton City School District invites Allegheny Intermediate Unit Head Start classrooms and other preschool programs to take part in its parade and programming.

“This has been a yearly tradition that allows these preschool programs to see what Clairton has to offer,” school board president Richard Livingston said. “We have families here, and we are showing them that Clairton (City) School District is alive and well.”

Students performed “What I Am,” an inspirational song about their growth. Berger said the song will become a Clairton tradition.

“We're going to teach it every year,” she said. “It will become a school song that students can sing for every special occasion.”

Jennifer R. Vertullo is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1956, or jvertullo@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.