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Officials in North Versailles fed up with littering

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Friday, April 18, 2014, 2:31 a.m.
 

North Versailles Township officials are fed up with people littering and treating the municipality like a garbage can.

“It's a shame the litter that's on these roads,” said board of commissioners vice president Frank Bivins at the board's meeting on Thursday.

“We need to start fining people for all this litter that's thrown all over the place. It's costing this town plenty of money for us to send guys out there to continually pick up litter. They pick it up one week, and the next week it's right back,” he said.

Police Chief Vince DiCenzo said enforcing littering laws is difficult because perpetrators need to be seen tossing the garbage onto the streets in order for the right person to be cited.

He did acknowledge that littering is a problem, particularly around businesses.

“A lot of it is coming from the businesses, the Dumpsters and everything else,” DiCenzo said. “They're talking about (litter) down along Greensburg Pike. We've had that problem there ever since Wal-Mart opened up because people load their cars up and let the bags blow all over the place. It's not only a problem here. It's a problem everywhere. People just need to pick up after themselves.”

A person cited for littering could see a fine anywhere from $25 to $300, plus court costs.

DiCenzo said residents need to take care when putting their garbage out, and make sure it's all in cans and not accessible to animals.

The littering discussion opened up to announcements about the township's cleanup day and having Dumpsters available for residents.

Cleanup day is April 26 starting at 9 a.m. at the township building. Supplies and lunch will be provided.

Board of commissioners president George Thompson said Dumpsters will be available at Green Valley Fire Hall and Crestas Fire Hall for two weeks, starting on April 25.

A Dumpster for electronics will be available at the township building on May 1.

Thompson encouraged residents to take advantage of the opportunities for spring cleaning.

All motions made at Thursday night's meeting passed unanimously except one.

Commissioner George Beswick cast the lone dissenting vote against paying Crestas Volunteer Fire Co. $22,234.64 from the fire tax.

Beswick said he does not believe the fire department is financially stable, and would like to see a financial plan before voting to allocate fire tax money.

Michael DiVittorio is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1965, or mdivittorio@tribweb.com.

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