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Liberty council renews police chief, borough secretary contracts

| Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 12:26 a.m.

Liberty council renewed the contracts of two borough employees at a regular meeting on Monday.

Council renewed contracts for police Chief Luke Riley and borough secretary Debra Helderlein through June of next year.

Both renewals are retroactive. Riley's contract had expired in November and Helderlein had been working without a contract since March 2013, according to borough Solicitor George Gobel.

The renewed contacts are shorter — previously the chief and secretary had been awarded five-year employment contracts — but they are otherwise the same, according to borough officials.

Gobel said the borough was following a path other municipalities have taken in reducing the contract period of its employees.

“I think contracts generally are shorter in government today,” he said.

Council member Jennifer Riley-McClelland, who is Riley's daughter, abstained from voting on the measure related to her father's contract. Larry Sikorski also abstained on the vote, saying he'd missed a meeting in which the extensions were discussed.

In other business, council voted to make part-time borough laborer Tim Sloss the part-time director of the public works department.

Sloss, who has been working a total of 30 hours a week as a laborer, now will spend 10 of those hours overseeing the department at a rate of $13 per hour. As a laborer, Sloss earns $9.65 per hour.

Mayor Jane Weigand reminds residents they will be ticketed if they park too close to fire hydrants.

Eric Slagle is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1966, or eslagle@tribweb.com.

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