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Light voter turnout predicted despite governor's race

| Saturday, May 17, 2014, 1:26 a.m.

Despite a four-way contest for the nomination for governor, the turnout for Tuesday's primary may be little different in heavily Democratic Allegheny County than the last time statewide issues took center stage.

County Elections Division manager Mark Wolosik predicted a 30 percent turnout for Democrats on Tuesday, while 20 percent of Republicans are expected at the polls.

“In 2010 the turnout was about 28 percent for both primary and general election,” Wolosik said.

Westmoreland County does not have similar projections.

Turnout may be up for both parties from last year in Allegheny voting.

“Last year Republican turnout was 16.86 percent and Democratic turnout 23.2 percent for the primaries,” Wolosik said. The 2013 voting mainly was for municipal and school offices.

Many in Allegheny County will have a Congressional contest in the Democratic primary, as 14th District U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle of Forest Hills takes on a rematch with the Rev. Janis C. Brooks of North Versailles Township.

Meanwhile, York businessman Tom Wolf, U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz from Philadelphia, state Treasurer Rob McCord and former state environmental protection secretary Kate McGinty square off for the right to take on incumbent Republican Gov. Tom Corbett.

Corbett is unopposed after the state Supreme Court removed Montgomery County conservative activist Robert Guzzardi from the ballot.

Wolf and McCord included the Pittsburgh area in last-minute campaigning, with Wolf rallying on Friday night at the Blue Top Pavilion in McKeesport's Renziehausen Park.

McCord planned a Saturday bus caravan through Pittsburgh and Harrisburg.

Patrick Cloonan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1967.

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