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Bridge rehab is largest Mon-Yough project

| Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, 4:31 a.m.

The $17.1 million rehabilitation of the Regis R. Malady Bridge between Elizabeth and West Elizabeth is the largest Mon-Yough project on the 2015-18 Transportation Improvement Plan approved on Monday by the Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission.

The next largest is a $15.46 million upgrade of Route 51 from Bausman Street in Pittsburgh to the Cloverleaf in Pleasant Hills. Around $13.373 million in federal funds are anticipated for the work in 2015 with the remainder to be spent in 2016.

In Westmoreland County, $4.37 million in reconstruction is proposed in 2017 on Route 51 between Route 201 and the Rostraver-Forward township line.

At the Cloverleaf on Route 51, more than $13.5 million in work is proposed for Lebanon Church Road in West Mifflin, Pleasant Hills and Baldwin. SPC proposed $250,000 in final design work next year, then a two-year effort with $6 million spent in 2016 and nearly $7.3 million in 2017 on reconstruction.

Nearby is the Homeville Road viaduct, between the West Mifflin Area High School/Middle School campus and The Village Shopping Center. SPC proposed $11 million in construction to take place during the next two years.

An overhaul of Route 837 is proposed by the commission from Seventh Avenue in West Homestead to Kennywood Park, with the bulk of a $9 million project planned for 2016 in five Steel Valley area boroughs.

Two bridges are in SPC's sights on and near Route 48 in Elizabeth Township and Lincoln.

On Route 2010 (Lovedale Road) in Lincoln, bridge replacement is planned over Wylie Run, with $150,000 in design work next year, $125,000 in utility and right-of-way work in 2016, then $2 million in construction in 2018.

Meanwhile, a $600,000 preparation is proposed for eventual rehabilitation of the Route 48 Boston Hollow Road bridge over Wylie Run in Elizabeth Township. SPC proposed $400,000 in design work for next year, then $200,000 in right-of-way work in 2017.

Bridge replacements are on tap at two rural locations in North Huntingdon Township. The commission proposed nearly $3.2 million in work beginning next year and concluding in 2016 on a span carrying Ardara Road over Norfolk Southern tracks and $700,000 in pre-construction work in 2016 on a span carrying Route 4019 over Brush Creek.

Other projects proposed by the commission that affect Mon-Yough area communities include:

• A $4.435 million bridge painting job next year on the Tri-Boro Expressway in North Versailles Township and East Pittsburgh.

• A $3 million diesel switchyard retrofit in 2015 on Norfolk Southern lines in Pitcairn as well as Conway in Beaver County and Shire Oaks in Washington County.

• A $2.9 million rehabilitation of the Route 30 bridge over Bessemer Avenue just west of the Westinghouse Bridge in East Pittsburgh, with construction planned in 2018.

• An overhaul of the Sutersville Bridge over the Youghiogheny River from Elizabeth Township, with $800,000 in pre-engineering work in 2016 and 2017 and $550,000 in construction work in 2018.

• Two pre-engineering efforts on either side of downtown McKeesport, for $500,000 next year on the Jerome Bridge and $600,000 in 2017 on the Duquesne-McKeesport Bridge.

• A $300,000 pre-engineering effort in 2017 toward eventual preservation of the Mon City Bridge carrying Route 136 from Forward Township to Monongahela, Washington County.

Patrick Cloonan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-664-9161, ext. 1967, or pcloonan@tribweb.com.

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