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Storage tank part of Mon Valley Sewage Authority upgrade work

| Friday, June 14, 2013, 10:31 a.m.
Jim Ference | The Valley Independent
Employees from DN Tanks, based in Boston, Mass., are shown building a three million gallon tank at the Mon Valley Sewage Authority's main plant at 20 S. Washington St., Carroll Township on June 5, 2013. The tank will be used to decrease the amount the treatment plant discharges into the Monongahela River.
Jim Ference | The Valley Independent
Employees from DN Tanks, based in Boston, Mass., are shown building a three million gallon tank at the Mon Valley Sewage Authority's main plant at 20 S. Washington St., Carroll Township on June 5, 2013. The tank will be used to decrease the amount the treatment plant discharges into the Monongahela River.

Construction of a major upgrade to the Mon Valley Sewage Authority's main facility is in full swing.

A 3.6 million gallon storage tank is being built at the authority's plant at 20 S. Washington St., Carroll Township.

It is near the Donora border.

The project is the last segment of Phase I of a long-term control plan to update the authority's treatment systems. The control plan grew from an agreement between the authority and the state Department of Environmental Protection.

The authority system drains stormwater and treats sewage for about 2,000 customers in Donora and 3,500 customers in Monessen.

Officials in each municipality signed off on the long-term control plan when it was submitted in 2008. The authority has 12 years to complete the approximately $40 million three-phase plan.

Authority General Manager Tom Salak said the new tank will be used to help decrease discharge into the Monongahela River. The plant now can handle 12 million gallons of combined daily flow (stormwater and wastewater.)

When it rains, and the plant exceeds 12 million gallons, it discharges into the river. Salak said the new tank will hold the excess. When the plant's amount goes below 12 million, the new tank will then work in reverse, pumping the combined daily flow back into the facility for treatment.

The tank project will cost about $3.6 million, which includes its construction, pipe and electrical work. DN Tanks, based in Boston, Mass., is constructing the tank. Salak said the work should be completed in September.

Phase I included a stormwater separation project on Parente Boulevard in Monessen; a new forced main line from the pump station on Donner Avenue to Monongahela Street in Monessen; a new forced main line from the Donora pump station on First Street to the main plant in Carroll Township; and a stream separation project on 14th Street in Donora.

Phase II involves a partial sewer line separation project in each municipality and a satellite treatment facility in Monessen.

Phase III will comprise construction of three satellite facilities in Donora and upgrades to pipes that discharge into the river.

Stacy Wolford is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-684-2640 or at wolford@tribweb.com.

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