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Monessen shooting victim facing drug charges

| Tuesday, June 25, 2013, 1:51 a.m.

A Monessen man – shot twice at a house party earlier this month – is behind bars after he allegedly tried to flush heroin down a holding cell toilet Sunday at the Monessen police station.

Deallo Craig Duncan, 21, of 1246 Knox Ave., was in custody Sunday afternoon after a traffic stop in which Monessen police seized three guns, including a semi-automatic pistol, according to Chief John Mandarino.

Duncan was charged with possession with intent to deliver, possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana, prohibited acts, obstructing administration of law and tampering with evidence.

He was arraigned Monday morning in Monessen by Magisterial District Judge Joseph Dalfonso and sent to Westmoreland County Prison in lieu of $25,000 cash bond.

Duncan is in the same jail as his alleged shooter, Deaubre Lightfoot, 22, of Donora.

Lightfoot is accused of pistol whipping Duncan before shooting him in the chest and side of the head June 8 in the basement of a Chesnut Street residence.

Lightfoot's preliminary hearing for attempted murder and other charges is scheduled Friday before Dalfonso.

After a brief hospital stay in the wake of the shooting, Duncan told Westmoreland County detectives he was unwilling to testify against Lightfoot and that he did not know who shot him, Mandarino said.

On Sunday, Duncan was in a holding cell when Lt. Jim Smith saw a “bundle” of suspected packaged heroin floating in the metal toilet the prisoner had flushed. A bundle is equal to 10 stamp bags.

Duncan was taken into the interview room, where he gave Smith five stamp bags of suspected heroin and a small bag containing suspected marijuana, according to an affidavit of probable cause.

Three others – two men and one 17-year-old – were arrested after the traffic stop, but remain unidentified, because no charges have been filed against them.

The firearms – a Taurus 9 mm pistol, a Ruger 9 mm pistol, and an Intratec TEC-DC9 (“Tec 9”) semi-automatic with 40-round clip – allegedly were discovered in two backpacks inside the vehicle.

Police sent the guns to a state police crime lab for DNA testing.

Mandarino said it is possible the other three in the car could end up facing charges.

Based on further investigation, Duncan could face additional charges. Federal charges are possible, Mandarino said.

“I'm just happy we were able to take three more guns off the street,” Mandarino said. “The ‘Tec 9' is not something you typically find out there. That one has the potential to do some serious damage.”

Duncan's preliminary hearing is tentatively scheduled for 9 a.m. Friday in front of Dalfonso.

Rick Bruni Jr. is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at rbruni@tribweb.com or 724-684-2635.

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