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Hot dog! Wienermobile cruises through the area

| Saturday, July 6, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
TYLER KIMMEL I FOR THE TRIBUNE-REVIEW
The Oscar Mayer Wienermobile made a stop Thursday, June 27, 2013, at the Walmart in West Brownsville.
TYLER KIMMEL I FOR THE TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Spectators check out the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile, which made a stop Thursday, June 27, 2013, at the Walmart in West Brownsville.

Southwestern Pennsylvania is home to many icons in history. From Fred Rogers to Joe Montana to the Primanti's sandwich, this area has seen its fair share of legends.

Another icon — the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile — made its way to West Brownsville on June 27. Hotdoggers Cold Cut Cokie (Cokie Reed) and Sam & Cheese (Sam Blum) drove the 27-foot-long hot dog on wheels and parked it in the Walmart lot for the day.

“We started on the 17th (of June) in South Bend, Ind.,” Blum said. “It's been fun. Everywhere we take the thing, it feels like we're in a parade.”

Every year, Oscar Mayer recruits college graduates to travel across the United States in the 14,050-pound Wienermobile (the weight of about 140,500 hot dogs) to help promote the brand and give fans a famous weenie-whistle. Blum, a marketing major from the University of Maryland, and Reed, a corporate communications major from the University of Texas, are two of just 12 Hotdoggers selected from 1,200 applicants.

Six Wienermobiles travel in different parts of the country for one year.

“It's awesome to be able to travel the country and see what makes each city unique,” Blum said.

The pair will travel the East Coast for the next year. Blum looked forward to their next stop in Baltimore during the Fourth of July weekend because it's near his family. Reed is just relishing the entire experience.

“It's not one stop I'm looking forward to,” Reed said. “It's just traveling the entire East Coast of the United States.”

Reed's favorite part of the experience so far has been experiencing the different cultures in each area. Blum's favorite part deals with one thing and one thing only: food.

“I love trying different foods in different areas,” Blum said.

The two Hotdoggers will continue to travel the East Coast until June 2014. Although they have many things they'd like to accomplish during that span, there is one goal that trumps them all.

“Our main goal is to spread miles of smiles,” Reed said.

Tyler Kimmel is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

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