TribLIVE

| Neighborhoods

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Carroll to Hartley King: Turn 'Frownies' upside down

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

In December 2004, Hartley King told The Valley Independent about plans to begin construction of a King's Family Restaurant at the intersection of routes 88 and 837 in the Fisher Heights section of Carroll Township by summer 2005.

The restaurant was to open by early 2006, the founder and president of the restaurant chain said at the time.

“King's was attracted to the area by the traffic at the intersection, along with the condition of the homes in that area and the reputation Carroll Township has as a very nice community,” King said in the interview.

But those plans never came to fruition, and the property sits vacant.

The Carroll Township supervisors said at a Tuesday meeting that they have heard the property may be sold to a developer for a Speedway gas station and convenience store.

Speedway is primarily located in the Midwest and South. It is the largest chain in central Ohio.

Resident Dennis Chew, who lives next to the site, said rats and other rodents infest the property. Chew said he and township zoning officer Dennis Butler have tried unsuccessfully to get King to clean up the property.

“I try to keep a decent home,” Chew said. “He just laughs at you people.

“He has the resources to keep that property up. He's a millionaire.”

Supervisor Tom Rapp added, “All (King) has to do is hire someone to come in and clean it up. What has he given to this community?”

Rapp told Chew that township officials are continuing to try to get King to clean up the site.

In other business, resident Alex Ferguson thanked the township for its crackdown on youths riding all-terrain vehicles in the Grandview area.

During the supervisors' June meeting, several residents raised concerns about young people riding ATVs in their neighborhood.

Rapp said that if residents experience such problems in the future, they should call 911, not wait for a supervisors' meeting to express concerns.

He said the operators of the Grandview Cemetery should post signs indicating “private property.”

Chris Buckley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-684-2642 or cbuckley@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Mon Valley

  1. 7 Up distributed from two Charleroi sites
  2. Director opposes increased cost of Ringgold project
  3. 2 men nabbed in Donora drug sting
  4. N. Belle Vernon man jailed after police station visit
  5. Monessen police, family looking for 17-year-old girl
  6. Donora police sued in mistaken ID case
  7. Summer youth program in Donora bridges gap between young, old
  8. Probation sought in former Yough coach’s sex-texting case
  9. Belle Vernon girl tops in cyber charter school class
  10. Monessen amphitheater brought back to life
  11. Man dies in Monongahela fire