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Rostraver nutritionist/chiropractor will be featured on WQED show

| Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Dr. Paulette Sedlak of Rostraver Township, right, is pictured at the WQED-TV studios in Pittsburgh with WQED executive producer Chris Fennimore during the taping of 'Return of the Zucchini,' which will air Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, on WQED.
Submitted
Dr. Paulette Sedlak of Rostraver Township, right, is pictured at the WQED-TV studios in Pittsburgh with WQED executive producer Chris Fennimore during the taping of 'Return of the Zucchini,' which will air Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, on WQED.
Dr. Paulette Sedlak of Rostraver Township, right, is pictured at the WQED-TV studios in Pittsburgh with WQED executive producer Chris Fennimore during the taping of 'Return of the Zucchini,' which will air Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, on WQED.
Submitted
Dr. Paulette Sedlak of Rostraver Township, right, is pictured at the WQED-TV studios in Pittsburgh with WQED executive producer Chris Fennimore during the taping of 'Return of the Zucchini,' which will air Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, on WQED.
Dr. Paulette Sedlak of Rostraver Township, right, is pictured at the WQED-TV studios in Pittsburgh with WQED executive producer Chris Fennimore during the taping of 'Return of the Zucchini,' which will air Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, on WQED.
Submitted
Dr. Paulette Sedlak of Rostraver Township, right, is pictured at the WQED-TV studios in Pittsburgh with WQED executive producer Chris Fennimore during the taping of 'Return of the Zucchini,' which will air Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, on WQED.

Dr. Paulette Sedlak will appear Saturday on the WQED television show, “Return of the Zucchini.”

The show runs from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Her segment should occur right around noon.

The show was taped last week at the WQED studios.

Sedlak, of Rostraver Township, was selected for the show after submitting her recipe for zucchini custard pie a few months ago.

“This recipe was given to me many years ago by one of my neighbors,” Sedlak said. “I do a lot of recipe makeovers, taking out unhealthy ingredients, putting in healthy ingredients. They usually taste better and with half the calories.”

The show's six guests were chosen from more than 160 recipes in a cooking book published by the PBS station to raise funds for its programming.

This is the 20th anniversary of cooking shows on WQED.

Sedlak met Chris Fennimore, executive producer of WQED, at fundraiser for the station in March.

Fennimore is the host of the show.

During Sedlak's appearance, she demonstrates how to makes her zucchini custard pie recipe. Her 10-minute segment ends with sampling the dish.

“It was a great experience,” Sedlak said. “For me, it was great to share my recipe makeovers because I'm all about helping people eat healthy. It was quite a privilege to be there for their 20th anniversary.”

Sedlak is a board-certified clinical nutritionist and has a master's degree in nutritional biochemistry. She also is a chiropractor.

This week, she is launching her website, www.cookingwithdoc.com.

On her website, she gives nutritional advice for topics such as weight loss and gluten-free lifestyles.

Earlier this year, she sold her chiropractic clinic, Dr. Sedlak's Laser Weight Loss and Nutrition Center, to concentrate on helping more people through her website and online communities.

“It's a bigger audience and I feel more people need nutritional advice,” Sedlak said. “That's why I started Cooking with Doc (her website).”

She offers a free report, “The Five food Secrets to Trigger Fat Burning,” on her website.

“That's a nice way for people to start healthy living,” Sedlak said.

“I'm excited to start this new chapter in my life. I'm happy to have this opportunity to help so many more.”

Chris Buckley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-684-2642 or cbuckley@tribweb.com.

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