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'Scaremare' takes over old trust building

| Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Submitted
The former Monongahela Valley Trust building will be transformed into 'Scaremare' for the 2013 Halloween season. Scaremare will take place every Friday and Saturday night in October and the ticket office located on the first floor of the bank building will open at 6 p.m. and close at 11 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person, or $12 if you register online www.scaremare.net. For groups of 10 or more call 814-444-9500.

Mark Slagle, owner of Slagle Roofing and Construction Inc., in Monongahela, bought the Monongahela City Trust Bank building in 2011. He has future plans for the building.

But in October, it will be used to stage “Scaremare” – providing Halloween entertainment for the community while raising funds for a couple of worthy charitable causes.

Scaremare was formerly held annually at Teenquest's site in Somerset County.

The event will benefit Teenquest's youth Bible camp held at a ranch in Somerset County.

Mark Witt started Teenquest in 1976.

“We were working with the church and wanted to reach out to more churches in the Pittsburgh area,” Witt said.

“We had our own ranch in Somerset County and started bringing students for weekends throughout the year. At the camp, there are a lot of activities, speakers, bands, horses, paintball battles, archery, and go carts.”

There are snow camps in the winter. They've expanded to serve churches throughout the northeast.

Witt, youth minister at Library Baptist Church, met Slagle there where he is a parishioner.

“When Mark (Slagle) told is about this building, we decided to combine our efforts,” Witt said.

In addition, Word of Life Ecuador, conducted by mission Daniel Gonzalez, will benefit from the proceeds.

Slagle made a trip to The Philippines with members of his church, Library Baptist Church, helping to build a girl's dormitory. Linda Finney, wife of Library Baptist Church Pastor Al Finney, is a native of The Philippines.

Slagle said he is also going to donate some funds to the city fire department from the proceeds of Scaremare.

The organizers of Scaremare are also accepting other sponsors, having received inquiries from others wanting to support the cause.

“This provides something else for kids to do and get something else out of it,” Slagle said.

“It's a Halloween tradition. It's a holiday attraction.”

Close to 70 volunteers from churches throughout the community will play the roles for Scaremare.

“Scaremare is not a haunted house but a horrifying experience at the Monongahela Valley Trust building, filled with people who are in despair, confusion and death at a time in history when the stock market crashed and America was going through the Great Depression,” Witt said.

The organizers recommend that children under 13 be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Scaremare will take place every Friday and Saturday night in October and the ticket office located on the first floor of the bank building will open at 6 p.m. and close at 11 p.m.

Tickets are $15 per person at the door, or $12 online at www.scaremare.net. For groups of 10 or more call 814-444-9500.

For more information, call 412-444-5187

Chris Buckley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-684-2642 or cbuckley@tribweb.com.

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