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Church tour set in Monongahela

| Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, 10:02 p.m.

With two dozen active houses of worship, Monongahela is known as the City of Churches .

In conjunction with the Chamber of Commerce, a self guided tour of 12 of the churches has been arranged for Friday, Nov. 22, from 6 to 9 p.m.

The event coincides with the city's Light Up Night, which follows the tours.

Booklets that give a history of the churches will be available at each site, and maps will be provided. Yard signs will be at the 12 churches, along with luminaries.

The 12 churches were chosen only because of their proximity to each other. There are 12 more churches in the city, plus two in neighboring New Eagle. All will be listed in the brochure.

The 12 participating churches, all in the vicinity of Sixth and Main streets, are:

• Nativity of the Virgin Mary Orthodox, 506 High St.

• Church of Jesus Christ, Sixth St.

• Ebenezer Baptist, Sixth St.

• St. Nicholas Orthodox, Sixth and Marne.

• First Christian (Disciples of Christ), 630 Chess St.

• First Presbyterian, West Main St.

• First Baptist, 601 West Main St.

• Church of God, 531 West Main St.

• First United Methodist, 430 West Main St.;

• Bethel AME, 700 West Main St.

• St. Damien of Molokai Parish, 722 West Main St.

• Church of the Nazarene, 206 Tenth St.

Many of the churches will have guides available.

Bethel AME still retains the secret entrance that Southern slaves used when they came off the Monongahela River in the Underground Railroad.

“Last year First United Methodist Church opened its doors on Light up Night for hot chocolate, cider and cookies and over 175 people came in to visit, pray and tour the church, member Carol Provan said.

There is no charge for participants and a welcome has been extended to anyone from throughout the Mon Valley.

Emma Jene Lelik is a freelance writer.

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