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Charges mounting in Monessen drug case

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Saturday, March 8, 2014, 12:06 a.m.
 

A Clairton man described by police as a major drug supplier in Monessen faces additional felony charges in the wake of his arrest last week.

Shon Tomas-P Terry, 43, of 824 Saint Clair Ave., appeared Friday before Magisterial District Judge Joseph Dalfonso in Monessen, where he waived his right to a preliminary hearing.

Dalfonso subsequently ordered him to stand trial in the Westmoreland County Court of Common Pleas.

Terry was arrested Feb. 28 by Monessen police aided by Rostraver Township police and state Attorney General's Drug Task Force agents, following a lengthy investigation into alleged drug activity in the city.

Terry was initially charged with three felony counts of manufacture, delivery, possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance, and misdemeanor counts of possession of drug paraphernalia and prohibited offensive weapon for possession of a switchblade knife, according to a criminal complaint.

Terry was arrested while sitting in his car in the 200 block of Shawnee Avenue. He allegedly had a brick of suspected heroin in his pocket, Monessen police Lt. James Smith said.

During a search of Terry's Dodge Neon at the Rostraver police station, investigators allegedly found about 40 bricks – or 2,000 stamp bags – of suspected heroin with a street value of $12,000 and about 16 grams of suspected crack cocaine worth about $800, police said.

Police said Terry was in possession of about $10,000 – presumably cash generated from drug sales to local drug dealers.

Smith amended Terry's criminal complaint Friday to add three felony counts of manufacture, delivery, or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance. Smith said investigators found six 15-milligram oxycodone pills, seven 30-milligram oxycodone pills and 28 methadone pills in his car.

Terry's attorney, Duke George Jr. of New Kensington, asked Dalfonso to reduce Terry's bond from $150,000 straight cash to $75,000.

Terry has been in the Westmoreland County Prison in Hempfield Township since his arrest.

Dalfonso denied the request, but dropped the $150,000 bond from straight cash to 10 percent, or $15,000, acceptable.

“That's the best I'll offer him today,” Dalfonso said during the brief court proceeding.

Terry last made headlines on Jan. 5, 2011, when he was shot eight times in the back and legs outside of a Pittsburgh apartment complex in the Spring Hill neighborhood.

Pittsburgh police said Terry was visiting the complex with his cousin and believe whomever shot him was trying to rob him.

Terry was returned to the county prison Friday. He faces formal arraignment 8:30 a.m. April 23 in the Westmoreland County Courthouse in Greensburg.

Stacy Wolford is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-684-2640 or at swolford@tribweb.com.

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