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Pies and pennies help raise more than $1,000 at Mt. Pleasant Area

| Wednesday, April 3, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Being a good sport once again is teacher Victor Snyder who permitted students to pelt him with pies during the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soceity's 'Pie the Teacher' event at Mt. Pleasant Area Junior-Senior High School.
Marilyn Forbes | For The Mt. Pleasant Journal
Being a good sport once again is teacher Victor Snyder who permitted students to pelt him with pies during the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soceity's 'Pie the Teacher' event at Mt. Pleasant Area Junior-Senior High School.
Teacher is happy to get a faceful of pie
Mt. Pleasant Area teacher Holly McGill gets a taste of some pie during the during the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's 'Pie the Teacher' fundraising event held Friday, March 29, 2013, at the district's junior-senior high school.
Marilyn Forbes | For The Mt. Pleasant Journal
Teacher is happy to get a faceful of pie Mt. Pleasant Area teacher Holly McGill gets a taste of some pie during the during the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's 'Pie the Teacher' fundraising event held Friday, March 29, 2013, at the district's junior-senior high school.
The students were treated to free water bottles that were tossed to them by faculty members during the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soceity's 'Pie the Teacher' event.
Marilyn Forbes | For The Mt. Pleasant Journal
The students were treated to free water bottles that were tossed to them by faculty members during the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soceity's 'Pie the Teacher' event.

Pennies and spare change have a way of piling up, just ask the students of the Mt. Pleasant Area Junior Senior High School.

The students there recently raised more than $1,000 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society just by collecting spare change.

“It's a great way to raise money,” said Sara Clarke, the society's campaign coordinator. “You really don't think about how much a little change can add up.”

The students, under the supervision of guidance counselor Terri Remaley, began to collect change a few months ago as a volunteer effort during their lunch periods and free periods.

The project was not for a club or to meant to meet any type of a requirement, Remaley said.

The students did it simply to help an organization that reaches out to families with loved ones who have been diagnosed with a blood related disease, she added.

“The students at Mt. Pleasant Area Junior-Senior High School are extremely generous and caring individuals,” Remaley said. “In addition to what they accomplished for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, they are constantly finding ways to help others and our community.”

In addition collecting change, the students conducted a society fundraiser in which students purchased chances to have the opportunity to hit one of their favorite teachers or faculty members in the face with a pie.

Eight faculty staff members volunteered to be a part of the assembly.

“I think it's a good cause, and this also gives the students the opportunity to reach their fundraising goal,” said teacher Victor Snyder, who was also a part of the assembly last year. “She (Terri Remaley) does so much for the student body and for the community. I was just happy to help.”

John Campbell, the school's assistant principal, also took a pie in the face for the cause and he said he was glad to do it.

“These kids really rise to the occasion,” Campbell said. “They have big hearts and this is just one way of showing it.”

The collection of change and the money gathered from the pie assembly raised $1,084.

“The success of the fundraiser is due to their efforts and the contributions of the students and their families,” Remaley said. “Our district staff members also donated to this cause and they are to be commended for their efforts to help others who are less fortunate.”

The money raised has already been donated to the society.

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

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