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Christmas at Salem Crossroads returns

| Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012, 8:52 p.m.

For two weekends next month, Bethlehem isn't a world away.

Volunteers and organizers will bring scenes of the first Christmas to life as part of the 40th annual Christmas at Salem Crossroads in Delmont. The outdoor event at Shields Farm features live vignettes of the prophecy, Caesar's decree, Mary and Joseph's journey to Bethlehem, the three wise men and other scenes from the Christmas story.

While visitors can spend hours perusing the Christmas pilgrimage, several Delmont churches also will host Christmas-themed demonstrations.

Salem Lutheran Church will present the gallery of trees, featuring 20 trees decorated in a variety of themes. Music and live performances will be offered along with dinner, desserts, hot chocolate and a coffee bar.

At Trinity United Church of Christ, a Civil War-era worship service will be held, along with children's skits and a performance from the church puppet ministry. The fellowship hall will house a holiday bazaar, nativity scenes, a train display and refreshments.

Delmont Presbyterian Church will host music groups On Our Way Home, the church choir and bell choir and No Strings Attached. On the final night, the church will host a Victorian parlor scene with a Christmas sing-a-long.

Faith United Methodist Church will host an old general store, a Christmas storytelling room for children and refreshments. Entertainment throughout the pilgrimage will include the Eastern Area Youth Chorale, On With the Show, True Grace from Cornerstone Church, the Delmont Community Band, Glitter Dot and Dan and On Our Way Home.

St. John Baptist de la Salle will host a large, live pine Advent wreath will be on display in the church driveway.

Daveen Rae Kurutz is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 8627, or dkurutz@tribweb.com.

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