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Display at North Hills Senior High focuses on POWs and MIAs

| Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, 9:21 p.m.
McKnight Journal
Items on a table set for the observance of National POW/MIA Recognition Day at North Hills Senior High School in Ross Township on Friday, Sept. 21, 2012, represent the ordeal facing imprisoned or missing military personnel and their families. Randy Jarosz | For the McKnight Journal
McKnight Journal
Eber Tripp, 66, of Ross Township, a member of Sgt. Joseph D. Caskey American Legion Post 80 in Ross, at right, talks to North Hills High Senior High School senior Jeff Heasley, 18, of West View, a Marine Corps recruit, and senior Alex Kratsas of Ross Township, an Army recruit, at left, about the symbolism of the table set for the observance of National POW/MIA Recognition Day on Friday, Sept. 21, 2012, at the school. Bob Fleischel of Shaler Township;, John Ciak, 62, of Ross Township; and Paul Kennedy look on. Randy Jarosz | For the McKnight Journal
McKnight Journal
North Hills Senior High School senior Alex Kratsas of Ross Township, an Army recruit, chats with Bob Fleischel of Shaler Township, at right, and John Ciak, 62, of Ross, both members of Sgt. Joseph D. Caskey American Legion Post 80 in Ross, during the observance of National POW/MIA Recognition Day at the school Friday, Sept. 21, 2012. Randy Jarosz | For the McKnight Journal

North Hills Senior High School students and staff observed National POW/MIA Recognition Day on Sept. 21, along with veterans from Sgt. Joseph D. Caskey American Legion Post 80 in the Laurel Gardens neighborhood of Ross Township.

Local veterans set up a POW/MIA tribute table outside the school in Ross Township and raised the black POW/MIA flag early in the morning, so students and staff could view it as they started the school day. Later in the day, the table was moved indoors into the lobby where informational material was available on the significance of each item on the table.

The table is set for one. Its small size represents the fragility of one prisoner against his or her captors.

The white tablecloth symbolizes the purity of soldiers' motives when they answer the call to duty.

The single red rose in the vase reminds viewers of the life of each of the missing and the loved ones of these Americans who keep the faith while awaiting answers.

The vase is tied with a ribbon that symbolizes the country's continued determination to account for the missing.

A slice of lemon reminds viewers of the bitter fate of those captured or missing in a foreign field.

A pinch of salt symbolizes the tears endured by those missing and their family members who seek answers.

The inverted glass symbolizes their inability to share a meal.

The empty chair reminds viewers of the missing.

Senior high staff members Pete Candreva and Sandy Miller brought the event to the attention of Principal John Kreider, who organized it at the school with members of the American Legion post.

— Submitted information

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