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Service brings groceries to curb for Market District customers

| Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, 8:57 p.m.
Pine Creek Journal
Robin Smith, of Ross Township, fills a grocery order for a customer at the Pine Market District as part of the new Curbside Express service. Bethany Hofstetter | Pine Creek Journal
Pine Creek Journal
Robin Smith, of Ross Township, fills a grocery order for a customer at the Pine Market District as part of the new Curbside Express service. Bethany Hofstetter | Pine Creek Journal
Pine Creek Journal
Robin Smith, of Ross Township, and Vinny Smith (unrelated), of Sewickley Township, review a customer’s grocery order at the Pine Market District as part of the new Curbside Express service. Bethany Hofstetter | Pine Creek Journal
Pine Creek Journal
Robin Smith, of Ross Township, packages a grocery order for a customer at the Pine Market District as part of the new Curbside Express service. Bethany Hofstetter | Pine Creek Journal

Customers at the Giant Eagle Market District at the Village of Pine no longer have to get out of their cars to do their grocery shopping.

Beginning this month, the company brought its Curbside Express service to the Pine Township location.

The service enables customers to shop and place orders online and then pick up their groceries at the store the same day.

“We tested it at our Robinson location in April with great customer reaction,” said Rob Borella, senior director of marketing and corporate communications.

“With all of the busy moms and families in this area … this is a great, easy, convenient way to shop, especially now when it's cold out.”

Customers can log on to MarketDistrict.com/Curb side to create a shopping list and choose an available pick-up time, which can be as soon as four hours from the time of order. Giant Eagle associates then will fill the orders.

Last week, Market District associate Robin Smith of Ross Township filled one of the store's first customers orders.

Identified by wearing a bright green shirt, Smith followed the order on a hand-held scanner, which organizes the shopping list by dry products, followed by produce, meats, dairy and then frozen items and ensures the store employees collect the correct items and quantities.

“I enjoy shopping for people, and I take pride in what I do,” Smith said. “I shop like I'm shopping for myself. They get what I would get.”

Customers also can make notes with items on their lists. For example, they can request slightly green bananas, a specific-sized item or a certain cut of meat, which then shows up on the personal shoppers' scanners.

“We don't want the experience to be any different than the one in the store,” said Brian Brand, Curbside Express manager.

Orders then are bagged, labeled and stored on shelves, refrigerators or freezers, depending on the item, until the customer arrives to pick up their orders.

At the time of pickup, store associates bring the groceries to customers' cars at parking spots marked in front of the stores and complete the sales from the parking lot.

The Curbside Express service carries a $4.95 fee; however, the first order is free.

The Market District has the potential to fill 50 orders per day, seven days per week with pickup times anywhere between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.

“Market District is known as a destination store,” Borella said. “Now, it's also convenient for weekly grocery shopping.”

Bethany Hofstetter is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6364 or bhofstetter@tribweb.com.

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