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School officials at Hampton earmark cash for projects

| Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013, 10:11 p.m.

Hampton Township School District administrators are vying to continue facility improvements by putting money aside for the 2013-14 school year.

Last week, Hampton's school board approved the transfer of $700,000 from the general fund to the capital project fund to cover the cost of a list of improvements at all but one of the district's buildings.

“Right now, this is our meager, if you will, capital improvement fund,” said Jeff Kline, director of administrative services.

The list includes evaluating swimming pool piping at the high school, which Mary Alice Hennessey, school board member and facilities chairwoman, said is original to the school. If needed, the improvement plan includes $20,000 to restore or repair the piping.

At the middle school, the administration plans to improve the band room, install storage cabinets for all instruments and install stairs at the stage to the mezzanine area.

Two of the most expensive items involve paving projects at Wyland and Central elementary schools.

The parking lots and roadways on the grounds of the two schools were last paved in the early to mid-1990s, and the district has had to postpone the projects recently because of a lack of funds. The two projects come with a combined price tag estimated at more than $500,000.

In addition to those improvements, proposed capital improvements also include providing power to the baseball scoreboard, installing athletic-field signs, and leveling and seeding the multipurpose field in front of the high school parking lot.

Larry Vasko, school board member and finance chairperson, said the capital-improvement list might change, depending on need and the final cost.

Bethany Hofstetter is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6364 or bhofstetter@tribweb.com.

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