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Hampton teens finish projects; earn Boy Scouts highest honor

| Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013, 7:45 p.m.
Pine Creek Journal
Dale Miller, left, and Kevin Rodack, of Boy Scout Troop 17, earned Eagle Scout, the highest rank in Boy Scouting.

Two Hampton High School students and Boy Scouts with Troop 17 earned Eagle Scout rank, the highest honor in Boy Scouting.

To earn the honor, seniors Dale Miller and Kevin Rodack, both of Hampton, each were required to earn at least 21 Merit Badges, including 12 Eagle-Scout required badges; show leadership to other Scouts; demonstrate living the Scout Law; obtain at least five letters of recommendation; and complete a community service project before their 18th birthday.

Miller, now 18, organized a project to build a path through the woods at WildBird Recovery, a wild bird rehabilitation center in Valencia, so visitors can see the birds in their natural habitat.

He organized a team of volunteers to clear the path and create a sign, which he had laser-engraved at the Hampton Middle School, for the path.

Rodack, 17, updated the landscaping at St. Andrew the Apostle Byzantine Catholic Church in Gibsonia, and coordinated the building of two large picnic tables for parish socials.

He organized a group of volunteers to weed the existing gardens, remove the old edging, install new edging with a more stable profile, add more landscape gravel and replace some shrubs. The 10-foot picnic tables were cut, stained and assembled by volunteers.

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