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Photo Gallery: Alpha School Talking Art Museum

| Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Randy Jarosz | For the North Journal
Providence Heights Alpha School fifh-grader Emilee Neuman (right) of Cranberry, portraying artist Edvard Munch, holds the microphone for fifth-grader Sarah Schupansky of Wexford, who is portraying the anguished figure in Munch's famous painting 'The Scream.' They were participating in the McCandless school's annual fifth-grade Talking Art Museum on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Fifth-graders research an artist and re-create one of the artist's paintings. They then give a presentation to other students at the school. The fifth-graders giving the presentation dress either as the artist or become part of the painting.
Randy Jarosz | For the North Journal
Providence Heights Alpha School fifth-grader Allison Edwards of Hampton (right), portraying Pablo Picasso, holds a microphone for fifth-graders re-creating Picasso's painting 'The Three Musicians.' In the painting, from right, are Christian Farls of Ross Township, Max Belt of Mars and Antonio Amelio of Cranberry. They were participating in the McCandless school's annual fifth-grade Talking Art Museum on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Fifth-graders research an artist and re-create one of the artist's paintings. They then give a presentation to other students at the school. The fifth-graders giving the presentation dress either as the artist or become part of the painting.
Randy Jarosz | For the North Journal
Providence Heights Alpha School fifth-grader Elena Ziccarelli of Wexford (right), portraying artist Paul CĂ©zanne holds the microphone for Clare Katyal of McCandless, who is part of Cezanne's painting 'The Autumn.' They were participating in the McCandless school's annual fifth-grade Talking Art Museum on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Fifth-graders research an artist and re-create one of the artist's paintings. They then give a presentation to other students at the school. The fifth-graders giving the presentation dress either as the artist or become part of the painting.
Randy Jarosz | For the North Journal
Providence Heights Alpha School sixth-graders Chip Strano of Wexford (right) and Matthew Soller of Sewickley try to guess the year Vincent Van Gogh's famous self-portrait was created. The painting is portrayed by fifth-grader Michael Place of Ross Township. as part of the Talking Art Museum on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Every year, fifth-graders at the school in McCandless research an artist and re-create one of the artist's paintings. They then give a presentation to other students at the school. The fifth-graders giving the presentation dress either as the artist or become part of the painting.
Randy Jarosz | For the North Journal
Providence Heights Alpha School fifth-grader Matthew Luckiewicz of Wexford (right), as animator Walt Disney, talks about 'Mickey Mouse as Steamboat Willie,' portrayed by fifth-grader Andrew Lusebrink of Hampton They were participating in the annual fifth-grade Talking Art Museum on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Fifth-graders at the McCandless school research an artist and re-create one of the artist's paintings. They then give a presentation to other students at the school. The fifth-graders giving the presentation dress either as the artist or become part of the painting.

Fifth-graders at the Providence Heights Alpha School in McCandless presented their Talking Art Museum on Oct. 28.

Every year, fifth-graders research an artist and re-create one of the artist's paintings. They then give a presentation to other students at the school. The fifth-graders giving the presentation dress either as the artist or become part of the painting.

The project is a popular one that students look forward to doing when they are in the fifth grade after seeing other students do the presentation in prior years, art teacher Jennifer Brown–Clair said.

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