Share This Page

Making honor roll could get tougher at Shaler Area

| Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

It soon might be harder for Shaler Area High School students to make the honor roll each quarter.

Administrators are discussing changing the honor roll system to limit the number of students who are eligible to the top 30 percent of the class instead of having honor roll status based on a student's grade-point average.

Under the current system, an average of 60 to 65 percent of the student population make the honor roll.

“It got us to think that might be inverted for what a true honor roll is,” said Tim Royall, high school principal. “It still would be a significant number of children receiving honors (with the proposed changes), but we feel it would more accurately reflect honor.”

The current system grants honor roll status to students who receive a grade-point average, or GPA, of 3.0 to 3.49, high honor for GPAs of 3.5 to 3.85 and highest honor for GPAs of 3.86 and higher.

However, with the weighted grading system, students can earn a GPA of more than 5.0.

In the first quarter of this school year, 63 percent of students made the honor roll. In the senior class, the status of highest honor went to 108 students who earned a 3.86 to 5.08 GPA, 66 students received the status of high honor, and 90 students were on the honor roll.

The proposed system would grant highest honor to the top 10 percent of the class, high honor to the top 11 to 20 percent and honor to the top 21 to 30 percent. Students who receive a “D,” “F” or incomplete grade on their report card would be ineligible for the honor roll.

Under the proposed system, only 114 of the 387 seniors would have made the honor roll. The 38 senior students in the top 10 percent of the class who would have received highest honor had a GPA 4.38 to 5.08. Students who would have had high honor under the proposed system earned a GPA of 3.81 to 4.06.

School board members expressed concern about limiting the honor roll and how it might affect students applying for college. School board member April Kwiatkowski, who is chairwoman of the education committee, requested that administrators discuss the proposed change with the high school counselors before the board votes.

“I'm in full support of this; my only concern is the counselors (opinion),” Kwiatkowski said.

The proposed change to the honor roll system will be discussed at the Committee of the Whole meeting of the school board on Wednesday, March 12. The next voting meeting is Wednesday, March 19.

Bethany Hofstetter is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6364 or bhofstetter@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.