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Ross officials hire architect for public-works building

| Thursday, March 27, 2014, 9:33 p.m.

Ross Township officials are moving forward with a $3 million project to replace the township's deteriorating public-works building.

Ross commissioners selected McLean Architects LLC, based on Pittsburgh's South Side, as the project architect at the March 17 meeting in a 8-0 vote, with Commissioner Dan DeMarco abstaining.

The current public-works building on Cemetery Lane is more than 50 years old and has “serious structural issues,” in addition to heating problems and a lack of space, public-works director Mike Funk said.

“The building is not functional,” he said.

It is used to store and maintain township-owned trucks, public-works vehicles, equipment and supplies.

A feasibility study done by township engineers outlined the options of rehabilitating the current building for about $1.5 million, extending the lifespan of the building by several years by modifying the structure for about $2.5 million, or razing and replacing it at an estimated cost of $3 million.

Township manager Doug Sample said the building will be torn down, and a new one expected to last 40 to 50 years will be constructed.

A project cost of $3 million was incorporated into the 2014 township budget.

The new structure will be about 32,000 square feet. It will store more than 30 public-works vehicles and allow the township to store more salt, which will prevent shortages seen this winter.

David McLean, principal architect on the project, said he anticipates designing the building officials want while staying within the budget would be his largest challenge.

Kelsey Shea is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6353 or kshea@tribweb.com.

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