TribLIVE

| Neighborhoods

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

North Huntingdon's off-road motorcycles used to keep ATVs out of parks

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

North Huntingdon police hope off-road motorcycle patrols will keep all-terrain vehicles and dirt-bike riders out of the township's parks.

Since the ATV patrols began, police have not issued any citations for riding ATVs and other vehicles in the township's parks, according to Chief Andrew Lisiecki.

“We were out (in late June), and basically, the officers didn't find anybody riding in the parks,” Lisiecki said. “They found a bunch of walkers who appreciated their presence in the parks, but there haven't been many riders out because of the rainy summer.”

In April, township officials traded in a 2010 Harley Davidson Road King motorcycle, which had 13,000 miles, at Mosites Motor Sports in North Huntingdon for two new Honda Enduro motorcycles, according to police Chief Andrew Lisiecki.

The two Enduro motorcycles came with a $9,800 price tag. Lisiecki said trading in the Harley Davidson covered the cost of the Enduro motorcycles. Without the Enduro motorcycles, police could not pursue ATV riders in the parks because their police cars and motorcycles aren't properly equipped to go off the road, Lisiecki said.

The Enduro motorcycles have license plates, which make them legal to drive on and off the road, Lisiecki said.

Police launched a public-awareness campaign in April to discourage ATV and dirt-bike riders from coming into the parks, which Lisiecki said he thinks is working.

“It seems like the message was received,” Lisiecki said. “We haven't seen anybody riding in the parks, which was our goal.

“We hope we don't have to write a single citation for people riding in the park.”

In April, police wrote three citations for riding dirt bikes in Braddock Trails Park, Lisiecki said.

Citations range from $100 for a first violation up to $1,000 for a third violation, Lisiecki said.

“We're going to continue patrolling the parks at random times for the foreseeable future,” Lisiecki said.

Brad Pedersen is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 8626, or bpedersen@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Rossi: Looking at the next great Steeler
  2. Steelers swap draft pick for Eagles cornerback
  3. McCullers’, McLendon’s prowess in clogging trenches crucial to Steelers defense
  4. After early criticism, Haley has Steelers offense poised to be even better
  5. Reds solve Cole, stave off Pirates’ 9th-inning rally
  6. Steelers notebook: Injuries finally become issue at training camp
  7. Penguins not alone in top-heavy approach to salary cap
  8. Pirates notebook: New acquisition Happ more than happy to fill spot in rotation
  9. Shell shovels millions into proposed Beaver County plant site
  10. Starting 9: Examining Pirates’ deadline decisions
  11. Roman Catholic Church in midst of culture clash over gays