Share This Page

Norwin educator one of six in country to attend academy

| Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013, 8:21 p.m.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Norwin Star
Katherine Kauffman, library media specialist at Norwin High School, will attend the Google Teacher Academy in London in December 2013. She is one of six in the United States selected to attend.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Norwin Star
Katherine Kauffman, library media specialist at Norwin High School, will attend the Google Teacher Academy in London in December 2013. She is one of six in the United States selected to attend. Kauffman works with student Devon Lee at the front desk in the library.

A Norwin educator will head to London to learn the newest trends in technology, then integrate them into her classroom.

Katherine Kauffman, library media specialist at Norwin High School, was selected to attend the Google Teacher Academy London next month. Kauffman is one of 50 teachers — only six from the United States — to earn a spot at the training.

“I'm hoping to bring back interesting new technology tools that will ultimately make our students more successful,” Kauffman said.

Norwin school board members voted to approve Kauffman's trip last week.

Kauffman transitioned into library services after working as an English teacher. She works with students from ninth to 12th grades.

Although she was interested in the book-end of library science, she realized how prevalent computers and technology had become for students.

“Not only are we teaching science, English and math, we're trying to incorporate skills for jobs that aren't even created yet,” she said. “We do have this need. It's a requirement to teach students these skills for jobs that don't exist yet.”

In addition to helping students with book selections, Kauffman said part of her responsibilities include showing students how to complete proper citations for research papers and using web tools for presentations.

“We really do cater to both sides,” Kauffman said. “I do have a large collection of fiction and nonfiction books that get used often. At the same time, I get to teach students how to do reliable web research with Google.”

The Google Teacher Academy is a two-day program that will show educators innovative instructional strategies and hands-on Google technology.

The program was started in 2006 at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Since then, it has been held in several locations across the United States, Australia and United Kingdom for more than 800 educators.

Amanda Dolasinski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 8626 or adolasinski@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.