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Penn Hills brings back marching bands for 'Festival in the Hills' after six-year absence

| Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Submitted photo
Members of the brass section march in formation during the Penn Hills Marching Band's preview night on Friday, Aug. 16, 2013. The band will march in full uniform at the Sept. 21 'Festival in Hills' at Yuhas-McGinley Stadium.

After a six-year absence, Yuhas-McGinley Stadium once again will be home to the walls of sound that only a group of quality marching bands can provide, as the Penn Hills School District hosts “Festival in the Hills” on Sept. 21.

Four marching bands — Penn Hills, the Mon Valley Express Drum & Bugle Corps, Northgate High School and South Allegheny High School — along with the Penn Hills NJROTC, will take the field starting at 7:30 p.m.

Band director Michael Berkey said the festival was forced to go on hiatus in 2007.

“This used to be a yearly event. We had 27 in a row up until 2007, when we were unable to continue it due to all the construction projects and the condition of the field,” Berkey said.

The festival is non-competitive and is a bit smaller than previous years, Berkey said.

The Big Red Marching Band will perform a halftime show with the theme “Give It All You Got: The Music of Chuck Mangione.” The show features jazz trumpeter Mangione's “Children of Sanchez,” “Give It All You Got,” featuring Jacob Nery on trumpet and Cameron Warren on alto saxophone and “El Gato Triste.”

Berkey said Mangione fans also will hear a few other tunes quoted briefly in the closing number.

“I'm looking forward to showing off Penn Hills students and facilities in the area,” Berkey said.

Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for students and senior citizens. For more information, call 412-793-7000.

Patrick Varine is an editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7845 or pvarine@tribweb.com.

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