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Homeowner asks Penn Township to remove brush at municipal park

- PHOTO/CHRIS FOREMAN John Poznick's Raymaley Road home can be seen through the wooded area that separates his property from Penn Township Municipal Park. Agitated by the appearance of the woods, Poznick asked the commissioners to clear out the trees and vines.
PHOTO/CHRIS FOREMAN John Poznick's Raymaley Road home can be seen through the wooded area that separates his property from Penn Township Municipal Park. Agitated by the appearance of the woods, Poznick asked the commissioners to clear out the trees and vines.
- PHOTO/CHRIS FOREMAN A park pavilion is just beyond the wooded area that provides a buffer between Penn Township Municipal Park and the Poznick property.
PHOTO/CHRIS FOREMAN A park pavilion is just beyond the wooded area that provides a buffer between Penn Township Municipal Park and the Poznick property.

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By Chris Foreman
Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

A longtime homeowner whose property borders the Penn Township Municipal Park wants township officials to clear out the thicket of trees, vines and brush that has served as buffer between his property and playground and pavilion area since the late 1990s.

Township commissioners last week asked manager Bruce Light to provide an estimate to clean up the wooded area but haven't committed to complying with John Poznick's request. Commissioner Paul Wersing also suggested a Boy Scout troop might be willing to volunteer for a project.

Poznick, a retired carpenter who has lived on Raymaley Road for 47 years, complained to the commissioners that the woods are an eyesore of decaying trees. He said he fears the area might attract termites to his home.

Township maintenance workers pruned the area last fall, but “they left a mess, and it looks like hell,” Poznick said.

“You look at this, here, and it's a jungle,” he added.

Tom Lamacz, public-works director for the township, declined comment.

The township paid the Shipkosky family $15,000 for the one-acre strip of land in 1997, one year after the Warrior Wonderland playground opened.

Though Light said the woods are “particularly unsightly” after the winter season, he recommends that the commissioners preserve the buffer.

The township doesn't have any money budgeted for a clearing of the woods this year, and township public-works employees already are focused on maintenance of more than 60 retention ponds in housing plans, Light said.

“Even if the cost is not an issue, I think it's contrary to have a park in a residential neighborhood,” Light said.

Chris Foreman is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

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