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Plum student government aims to help those in need

| Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, 11:51 p.m.
(c) 2012 Lillian DeDomenic
Taylor Cestra (#12) and Emily Sebunia (#29) celebrate a senior TD. In this year's Powder Puff football competition, the seniors won a showdown against the juniors with a score of 20-14. The games are presented by the Plum Student Government. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
(c) 2012 Lillian DeDomenic
Plum High School principal and coach Ryan Kociela talks to his senior team. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
(c) 2012 Lillian DeDomenic
Powder Puff cheerleaders Corey Williams, Mike Hoysan, Jimmy Messina, Ryan Ginter and Eric Green perform at halftime. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
(c) 2012 Lillian DeDomenic
Aaliyah Odom, #76, prepares to score a touchdown during the powder puff game on Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012. The games are presented by the Plum Student Government. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
(c) 2012 Lillian DeDomenic
The junior team takes a time-out during the powderpuff football competition on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2012 in Mustang Stadium. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader

The senior girls won the DiSilvio-Kerns Trophy and bragging rights with a score of 20-14 at last month's 23rd annual powder puff game at Plum Senior High School.

Student government sponsors the friendly flag-football event each year as its biggest fundraiser. The event raised $4,392 this year, said Lynda Frazetta, student government sponsor and American history teacher at the high school.

“The coaches do a great job of working everyone into the game,” added Frazetta, who helped to coordinate the event.

Proceeds benefit The Plum Food Pantry, the Sunny Carney Carcinoid Cancer Fund and the Carolyn Nonnenberg Scholarship Fund. Nonnenberg was an English teacher at the school who recently died after suffering from cancer.

About 150 junior and senior girls competed in the powder puff game.

“It's very popular,” said Mitchell Trenz, 18, Student Council president.

Each grade assembles a team, which includes all girls who want to play, he said.

Many students and staff members supported the game off the field as well, Frazetta said. The chamber choir sang the national anthem, the band played for the crowd, and the Air Force Junior ROTC cadets performed flag and color presentations. The concessions were run by the PTSA.

“The event involves so many people,” Frazetta said.

While the powder puff game is student government's biggest fundraiser for the community, student leaders seek opportunities to help communities in need.

Last year, after the tsunami in Japan, the students folded thousands of origami cranes for a charity that donated money for disaster relief.

Frazetta incorporated that service project into her class lesson on World War II.

“These are awesome kids who work really hard. They go above and beyond,” she said.

Mandy Fields Yokim is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

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