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Adlai students, parents get sneak peek of old Pivik building

| Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
Mike MacConnell and Principal Jason Kinsley show Nyzier Miyares, his third-grade computer classroom. Parents and students of Adlai Stevenson Elementary School had an opportunity to visit the temporary site of the school, the former Pivik Elementary, during an open house on Aug. 15, 2013. Tours of the building, meeting the teachers and even a ride on the school bus were part of the experience.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
Deora Matvey, Ryla Thomas and Vanna Ricketts check out their new first-grade classroom. Charisse Sarnicola-Oto is the teacher. Parents and students of Adlai Stevenson Elementary School had an opportunity to visit the temporary site of the school, the former Pivik Elementary, during an open house on Aug. 15, 2013. Tours of the building, meeting the teachers and even a ride on the school bus were part of the experience.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Plum Advance Leader
Kaiya Russell, fourth grade; Sydney D'Amico, sixth grade; and Jenn Russell, Kaiya's mom, check out the lockers. Parents and students of Adlai Stevenson Elementary School had an opportunity to visit the temporary site of the school, the former Pivik Elementary, during an open house on Aug. 15, 2013. Tours of the building, meeting the teachers and even a ride on the school bus were part of the experience.

Pete Bobich initially was skeptical about his son attending classes at the former Pivik Elementary building.

“I thought ‘the school isn't being used for a reason,' ” said Bobich, 33, of Plum whose son, Bryce, 6, attended kindergarten at Adlai Stevenson Elementary.

Bobich's concerns were put to rest after meetings with Superintendent Timothy Glasspool, Adlai Stevenson Principal Jason Knisely and members of the school's PTA.

“Once they described the plan, it made sense to send the students here rather than cramming them in other schools,” Bobich said last week during an open house for Adlai Stevenson Elementary parents and students at the former Pivik building.

“I am blown away how they got the school ready,” said Bobich who, with his wife, son and other families, walked through the rooms that teachers have decorated and set up desks and books for students who return to classes on Monday.

Adlai Stevenson's 350 students are attending the former Pivik building this school year as a new Holiday Park Elementary is being constructed on the Adlai site. The site is being cleared following the demolition of the Adlai Stevenson building. Construction of the new building is scheduled to start in September and take 14 months, said Dennis Russo, the district's construction representative.

The Plum School Board approved spending a maximum of $13.8 million on the new building and $20 million for the entire project.

“They made (the departure from Adlai Stevenson) something special for the kids,” Bobich said. “They had a good-bye Adlai (party) with balloons.”

Kelly Zoller is excited for her son, Cory, 6, who will be a first-grader, to ride a bus to school. Zoller walked her son to Adlai Stevenson.

“I like the gym,” Cory Zoller said.

District officials encourage parents to send their children on buses to the Pivik building rather than placing more vehicle traffic on the road that has been converted to one way entering from Old Leechburg Road and exiting onto Center New Texas Road.

The new Pivik Elementary also is on School Road, across the street a slight distance from the former Pivik building.

Charissee Sarnicola-Oto, a first-grade teacher, enlisted some help from her mother, Carol Sarnicola, a retired teacher, to help prepare her first-grade classroom.

“I had a lot of anxieties because Adlai was my home for 12 years,” Sarnicola-Oto said. “Now I am excited.”

Karen Zapf is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 8753, or kzapf@tribweb.com.

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