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Scottdale Catholic school receives 25 laptops

| Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, 9:02 p.m.
Some of the laptop computers donated to St. John the Baptist Regional Catholic School Oil and Gas Title Abstracting.

Christmas came early for St. John the Baptist Regional Catholic School in Scottdale when Oil & Gas Title Abstracting donated 25 laptop computers.

A Scottdale resident, OGTA employee and parent of children enrolled in the school decided more technology would be useful for education and decided to do something about it anonymously.

“When I learned that OGTA was decommissioning some laptops, I saw an opportunity to help the school that has helped my family so much,” said the anonymous donor in a Dec. 20 email.

Joseph Dreliszak, principal of St. John the Baptist, accepted the laptops from the anonymous donor as “an added bonus.”

He plans for the kids to use them for Internet research and educational web sites.

“This is just another way to use the gifts of others to compliment our current technology program,” he said.

OGTA also donated 26 laptops to Goodwill in Pittsburgh where they will be used to help drivers become more familiar with modern technology, said Lori Naser, the company marketing and training coordinator and human resource liaison. “We have been very active in the communities of Westmoreland County,” she said. “And I just really love my job for it.”

The anonymous donor agreed. “I am so grateful to work for a company whose employees are always willing to listen and go the extra mile when an opportunity arises to do something good.”

OGTA, which is based in Washington, Pa., was founded in 2007 by a group of private investors in Michigan.

The company performs oil, gas and coal title-related searches for residential and commercial property in the tri-state area, according to its website.

Andrew Hesner is a freelance writer.

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