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Sewickley library to offer adult computer classes

| Tuesday, July 2, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

For many, mobile phones and computers are a way of life.

But for older generations, computers still might be difficult to understand, said Sewickley Public Library office manager Sarah Davies, who is organizing two computer classes for older adults seeking to learn how to use technology.

“There is a need in the community for basic computer classes,” Davies said.

Her first class focuses on basic computer skills in a Windows-based platform. A second class offered in August will focus on digital photography.

“We get a lot of questions like, ‘I don't know what the (control) button is on the keyboard.'

In addition, Davies said using a computer might be difficult for older adults with various health issues.

“if you're older and you have arthritis, it could be difficult using a mouse,” she said. “So we want to start very basic and go from there.”

The classes are offered through the OASIS program, which focuses on educating those at least 50 years old through classes and other programming.

Each class is comprised of two, two-hour sessions with a maximum of six participants per class.

“There's a real emphasis on individualized instruction,” Davies said. “Everybody has to sit at their own computer. You cannot just watch. You have to participate. They're relaxed, fun classes.”

If interest grows, Davies said she and other library staff will consider adding more classes, and also might include additional topics later.

Davies said she hopes adults consider the classes.

“A lot of older people have been avoiding it, because it's like learning an entirely different language,” she said.

Bobby Cherry is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-324-1408 or rcherry@tribweb.com.

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