Share This Page

Running Around: Cheers to toasting a very important 21st birthday

| Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, 8:11 p.m.

It seems like only yesterday when I was 21 and buying my college boyfriend a beer because he was only 20.

Now, 30 years later, my daughter is turning 21, and — although my mother never would have done it for me — I have decided to take her out for her first drink.

Our plans include a fun night at the Pittsburgh Improv, dinner and then ordering her first cocktail exactly at midnight on her birthday.

I figure I will be there to keep her safe, and we will get to experience a milestone in her life together. She plans to order a cosmopolitan, like Carrie on “Sex and the City.”

Unlike many college students her age, this truly will be my daughter's first real drink. She has stuck to her guns about not drinking, even though some of her college friends have left her out of their plans because they knew she wouldn't drink.

She says she doesn't plan on becoming a big drinker and really doesn't feel the need to overindulge. She doesn't see a purpose for it. I'm not sure what the future holds for her in that department, but my hopes are that she hangs onto that conviction.

We have talked many times about what happens if she does overindulge.

She has made a solemn promise to me never to drink and drive, and if she finds herself in a situation when she shouldn't be driving — but needs to get home — she will call me. In turn, I have made a promise not to judge her or get upset and to just be there if she needs me.

Although I'm aware that many times promises are not kept — and I've made my fair share of lapses in judgment — I'm keeping my fingers crossed and hoping my daughter keeps her lapses to a minimum.

Joanne Barron is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-324-1406 or jbarron@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.